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Mohan Lal’s Best Movies Ever

Mohan Lal’s Best Movies Ever

Mohan Lal is a super star in Malayalam film industry that is based out of Kerala in South India. He’s popular throughout India and abroad as a talented and highly versatile actor. His fans in Kerala treats him as an elder brother and calls him ‘Lalettan’. Here are some of his latest and upcoming movies that have got rave reviews from critics and media alike.

Shikkar – The Hunt

Released on September 9, 2010, this Mohanlal film went on to become one of the biggest blockbuster of Kerala film industry. The film that portrays Lal as a lorry driver has received positive reviews from all quarters. After few films that failed to make it big at the box office, Shikkar can be considered as his re-entry into the industry.

As the title goes, the film revolves around Balaraman, a lorry driver who decides to take revenge after being helpless for long. At any point, one wouldn’t know what would happen next – that’s the way in which the film has been made. The second half of the movies is packed with stunts ending in a superb climax. The film is still running in packed cinemas through out Kerala and is a must watch for any Keralite, let alone a Mohan Lal fan.

Casanova

In this mega budget Malayalam movie, Mohan Lal plays the role of a successful businessman nicknamed Casanova, who runs an international chain of flower boutiques called Casanovva’s Eternal Spring. He believes in the simple philosophy that love cures everyone. Beautiful women accompany him at all times and this sprouts envy in all men. Roma, Lakshmi Rai, Sanjana and Shriya Saran are among the lead female actors at their helm in Malayalam industry who are cast against Mohan Lal in the film. The film also has four villains who bring in the factor of suspense and twist.

When we say that Casanova is the most awaited Malayalam movie ever, it literally is true – fans have been waiting for the release of this big budget movie for over three years now. Casanova had slipped schedules may a time and some of the original cast is no more there in the movie. The release is planned around Christmas 2010 and may get delayed till early next year. This is the first time that such a film is produced in Malayalam and this would be our pick for the New Year.…

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Movie Review: The Illusionist (2011) – Directed by Sylvain Chomet

Movie Review: The Illusionist (2011) – Directed by Sylvain Chomet

The Illusionist perfectly combines the unique, detailed visual style of Oscar-nominated animator/writer/director Sylvain Chomet with the melancholy, simple and poignant storytelling approach of celebrated writer/director/actor Jacques Tati. Although traditionally animated, the film could easily have been a live action work, especially with the lead character so closely mimicking Tati’s own Monsieur Hulot (a single clip from Mon Oncle pays appropriate homage), and the use of a dramatic, tragic, romantic plot that never strays from reality. It’s occasionally sad, oftentimes humorous, and always touching.

An aging magician (voiced by Jean-Claude Donda) in 1960s Paris somberly realizes that his amusing craft is no longer an exciting art form for the crowds of youngsters that cheer for opening acts like Billy Boy and the Britoons, a stereotypical rock group with springy hair, colorful suits and giddy demeanors. When his venue tumbles from a classy music hall to a crowded park, he journeys to Scotland for work. He’s greeted by friendly people and finds small success at a little pub, where he also meets Alice (Eilidh Rankin), a young woman working as a maid and innkeeper.

The elderly man takes a liking to the girl, and treats her to a new pair of shoes. When he gathers together enough money to return to Paris and try his tricks anew, he takes Alice with him; the two share a small apartment (joined by his feisty white rabbit) and are content with their new father/daughter relationship. While their happiness never really dwindles, the poverty surrounding them, and the magician’s slow but steady inability to hold a job (let alone a magic-oriented act) in the trying times, weigh heavy on their livelihood.

Chomet’s animation and character designs are curiously sightly in the way the characters have too much detail (signified by excessive lines) in odd places, such as the wrinkles in the face or the folds in clothing or the creases in hands. Most of them are quite ugly due to the extreme exaggeration in physical distortions, from plump noses placed high on the head, to thinly stretched lips pulled across large teeth, to the incredibly obese, short and stocky, gangly or off-balance. Facial features are always elongated, misplaced, shrunken, or mutilated in hilariously stylized fashions. With the watercolored backgrounds and equally exaggerated body movements, Chomet’s animations are instantly recognizable.

The near nonexistence of dialogue allows the movie to be universally appealing and understandable, with the simplicity of the plot aiding in bringing the character designs to the forefront (so too are the background characters carefully stylized). Some may scoff at the intentional pacing, woeful mood, or the lack of action, but the heartfelt acts of kindness and saddening emotional stresses are beautifully realized. The Illusionist joins The Triplets of Belleville as a stunning masterpiece of illustration, animation, character design and story.…

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Shoah Movie Review

Shoah Movie Review

I am hard pressed to say what Shoah (Hebrew for ‘catastrophe’) is. It is certainly not a movie, nor is it a documentary in the ordinary sense of the word. It is a 900-minute manifesto and testimony. It brings back landscapes of an anti-world, a place that hates life and is mindlessly yet systematically determined to destroy all traces of it. It is a huge monument to the Holocaust, and the footage is a world treasure. We will never meet these people again; they all will soon be or have already died of old age.

The only thing that happens in the ten hours of Shoah are the interviews- words and faces, slow, detached pans of Polish landscapes, trains (lots of trains), towns as they are today, and the extermination camps where the many millions were murdered. But Shoah is not yet another sensational documentary of the Nazi holocaust. It gives us no grim footage of liberated camps or demonizing portraits and footage of brutal Nazi SS leaders. Through intimate interviews with survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators, Shoah first stuns numbs us with its minute detail of everything seen and heard at the time of the transports and as we gradually come to our senses forces us to examine what it means to be human.

Shoah does not let the viewer escape without a new and profound sense of not only an evil that has gone beyond human control, but also of the hope that we must carry in our hearts as an eternal torch that we are capable of stopping such things from happening. Shoah is the most heartbreaking accounting of human events that I have ever seen, but seeing it also gives one an imperative passion and duty to seek joy in life, or else there is no point in living. Shoah does not demonize or victimize intentionally; it is like a runaway train out of control. All the faces in Shoah are human, and all demand our compassion, even the SS officers.

Shoah is a mammoth and monumental contribution to the Holocaust Museum, and its interviews are priceless. To say that it goes beyond our conception of human life and behavior just scratches the surface of this profound masterpiece. Shoah is many things at the same time, and if it is dazing it is also reaffirming. If it is bleak and merciless it is also hopeful and kind. It is never apologetic nor is it propagandistic. In the final analysis, to see this film is tough, but it forces a metamorphosis of the mind, and in the end one is left with a strong sense of dignity. This film is one of those very rare pieces that can change one’s life for the better.…